~Poet’s Corner- Elizabeth Barret Browning~

   Today, I’m going to try to do a post about one of my favorite woman poets, Elizabeth Barret Browning!!

 She had a very interesting life story. I haven’t read all her poems but when I read Nancy Moser’s book, “How Do I love Thee”, it introduced me to her “Sonnets from the Portuguese” which I really enjoyed.

  I really love Nancy Moser’s book about her life story it’s a really great read. I love how she mixes fact with fiction.  I was surprised as to how much was really fact. I hope you enjoy her poetry down below! 

E.B.B

 

How Do I Love Thee?

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
I love thee to the level of every day’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,

Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

Comfort

SPEAK low to me, my Saviour, low and sweet
From out the hallelujahs, sweet and low
Lest I should fear and fall, and miss Thee so
Who art not missed by any that entreat.
Speak to mo as to Mary at thy feet !
And if no precious gums my hands bestow,
Let my tears drop like amber while I go
In reach of thy divinest voice complete
In humanest affection — thus, in sooth,
To lose the sense of losing. As a child,
Whose song-bird seeks the wood for evermore
Is sung to in its stead by mother’s mouth
Till, sinking on her breast, love-reconciled,
He sleeps the faster that he wept before.

Exaggeration

WE overstate the ills of life, and take
Imagination (given us to bring down
The choirs of singing angels overshone
By God’s clear glory) down our earth to rake
The dismal snows instead, flake following flake,
To cover all the corn; we walk upon
The shadow of hills across a level thrown,
And pant like climbers: near the alder brake
We sigh so loud, the nightingale within
Refuses to sing loud, as else she would.
O brothers, let us leave the shame and sin
Of taking vainly, in a plaintive mood,
The holy name of GRIEF !–holy herein
That by the grief of ONE came all our good.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning
How Do I Love Thee? (Ladies of History #4)

XIV (If thou must love me, let it be for nought)

If thou must love me, let it be for nought
Except for love’s sake only. Do not say
“I love her for her smile–her look–her way
Of speaking gently,–for a trick of thought
That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
A sense of ease on such a day–”
For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
Be changed, or change for thee,–and love, so wrought,
May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
Thine own dear pity’s wiping my cheek dry,–
A creature might forget to weep, who bore
Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!
But love me for love’s sake, that evermore
Thou may’st love on, through love’s eternity.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning Quotes

by Elizabeth Barret Browning:

 

“Light tomorrow with today”

“God’s gifts put man’s best dreams to shame.”

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